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Strategy Development

Patterns of Strategy Development

Henry Mintzberg
Henry Mintzberg argues that strategy emerges over time as intentions collide with and accommodate a changing reality, rather being due to a deliberate planning process. This emergent strategy not envisaged in the planned strategy of the organisation. For e.g. a supplier pursuing modern ideas on supplier/customer relationships might encourage a partnership approach to sourcing. It is easy to imagine that buyers in the customer organisation might see benefits in this, and could pursue the idea to the point where sourcing strategy took on an aspect not at all contemplated when planned strategic developments were laid down.

Example

Potbelly Sandwich Works began in 1977 as a small antique store run by a nice young couple. Despite the fast-paced, never-a-dull-moment world of antique dealing, the couple decided to bolster their business by making sandwiches for their customers. What began as a lark, turned out to be a stroke of genius. Soon, people who couldn't care less about vintage glass doorknobs were stopping by to enjoy special sandwiches and homemade desserts in this unusual atmosphere. Potbelly Stove

As the years passed, the lines grew. Booths were added, along with ovens for toasting sandwiches to perfection, vista-coolers, napkin dispensers, hand-dipped ice cream - even live music. The little antique shop had become the full-fledged, totally unique sandwich joint that you enjoy in America today.

'Mintzberg argues there is more to business success (and life) than MBAs. 'To be superbly successful you have to be a visionary - someone with a very novel vision of the world and a real sense of where they are going. If you have that you can get away with murder. Alternatively, success can come if you are a true empowerer of people, are empathetic and sensitive. Often, visionaries create companies and success is continued by empowerers.'

Turtles
Source: Pop and Son Turtles

Think of any opportunity that feel can change your life !!!

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